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Aberdare Boys’ Grammar School

Sporting Activities

Old School

The Past Students Rugby XV that played against the School, April 1959

from R.T. Matthews
 

Past Students Rugby 1959

Back Row: Colin Davies, Wynford Morris, Gerald Edwards, Lyn Thomas, Dilwyn Davies, Keith Rowlands, Morton Davies, and Gwyn Griffiths
Front Row Kneeling: Tommy Thomas, Bill Owen, Roy Brackston, Bob Matthews, Alan Thomas, John Escott, and John Lloyd

The School submitted the following account of the match to the local press

Past Students win by point

Every school rugger game can be classified as a tough struggle, but seldom has such an epic clash been seen as that between the Aberdare Boys’ Grammar School Present XV and the Past Students 1959 side (pictured here).

The Past Students came down on the ‘School’ like Assyrians on to the fold.

To the cheering crowd on the touchline it seemed impossible that the School XV could even think of standing against such huge opponents. Their captain was dwarfed when they tossed the coin for the advantage by a Llanelly player of gigantic size (Keith Rowlands).

Soon, however, a basic principle of physics became evident — to everything there is an equal and opposite reaction. The Past-Students though large of limb were short of wind. The School played hard the whole time. They tackled with ferocity and when in possession of the pill they ran with determination.

As might be expected, the static play was dominated by the more powerful Past-Students. But their power-tactics were nullified when a quick-attempt at a forward rush was stopped by the battling school pack. The play was in the main close — the hard tackling saw to that, but when the ball did go loose the School halves ran well. It is an indication of the trend of play that the School scored two tries through their backs while the Past-Students scored by frantic forward dashes.

The result was a win by the Old Boys’ team by a hair-breadth margin of one point (final score 11 - 10). Please don’t ask for details: we were all too exhausted to note much about anything.